Connect with us

Local News

Some major changes in allocations to beneficiary agencies of the Jewish Federation as of Sept. 1 – Gray Academy to receive $26,000 less than last year

Allocations Report 2022By BERNIE BELLAN The Jewish Federation will be allocating exactly the same total amount of money to its beneficiary agencies in the 2022/23 fiscal year (beginning September 1) as it did in 2021/22: $3,003,000. But – the distribution of those funds will be markedly different this coming year than it was in the fiscal year that will end August 31.
That is the major takeaway from this year’s report of the Federation’s Budget & Allocations Committee.

 

 

 

allocations edited 1
Of its 12 beneficiary agencies, moreover, two will not be operating at all this coming year and are, therefore, not being funded: The Irma Penn School of Jewish Learning (“which lost their newly recruited teacher just before the school year began and was not able to find a replacement mid-year”) and the Jewish Learning Institute (which “is finishing the current season with remote programming but will have to resolve staffing before establishing what the program will look like going forward.”)

Of the remaining ten agencies, the most notable changes will be occurring in: funding for the Gray Academy, which will see a drop of $26,000 in its allocation; a $10,000 drop in allocation for the Simkin Centre; a $5,000 increase for the Gwen Secter Centre (along with the transfer of the “senior concierge” position to Gwen Secter from Jewish Child & Family Service); and a $20,000 increase in allocation for JCFS.

The continued effects of the Covid pandemic have made planning much more difficult for many of the agencies.
In a section of the report titled “Beneficiary Agencies Highlights and Needs,” the Allocations Committee enumerated the many challenges facing the agencies in general:
“Pandemic Recoveries and Overall Trends: The Winnipeg Jewish community benefits from strong Beneficiaries that found creative ways to serve their constituencies in the face of restrictions on service, safety and health concerns. They are all budgeting and planning for more ‘normal’ years of service in the next year. However, each agency has a Plan A and a Plan B and a variety of scenarios that are on their radar, having learned to expect uncertainty. Every agency expressed cautious optimism about the year to come as well as concerns:
• Concern about inflation and rising supply costs, specifically food, gas, and biodegradable packaging;
• Each agency is coming into the next year in a good financial position, some with significant surpluses because of government subsidies and foundation grants during the pandemic, fortunate but not likely to repeat;
• There continue to be some additional costs associated with fewer people allowed in the same spaces, hybrid/online service costs, heightened attention to cleaning, etc.;
• Several agencies mentioned wanting to use surpluses to build their reserves as they look forward to leaner years with expected reductions in membership and fee revenues, while they re-build programming and fundraising revenues;
• There is concern around the pace of resumption of in-person participation and attendance, and willingness to pay at pre-pandemic levels as in-person programming resumes, all affecting overall revenue;
• There is a general concern about bringing back families, students, campers, members that have not been vaccinated and who may feel alienated. And a similar concern about those who feel vulnerable and may choose to stay away from in-person activities once mask and vaccine mandates are lifted in community venues;
• They are opening back up for in-person programs and field trips etc. but with lots of alternative plans;
• Teen mental health is a (sic.) emergent concern everywhere;
• Providing competitive wages to recruit and retain staff is a concern in most agencies; and
• Those awaiting government funding from MB starting April 1, 2022 have not received confirmation from relevant government departments.”

We sent an inquiry to Faye Rosenberg Cohen, Chief Planning and Allocations Officer for the Jewish Federation of Winnipeg, asking her about the relatively large cut in the allocations to Gray Academy and the Simkin Centre. It should be made clear though, that the allocation to the Simkin Centre is for two specific purposes that are separate and apart from the day to day operation of a personal care home: “The allocation funds High Holiday services and kashrut supervision to support the Jewish character of the home.”

Rather than refer specifically to the cuts to Gray Academy and the Simkin Centre though, Faye Rosenberg Cohen responded that “The changes from last year are based on expressed needs, financial health of the beneficiary organizations and the need to balance. The decreases only reflect the need to rebalance for current needs. We try to approach each year with fresh eyes, not with a focus on last year. We are grateful to have strong agencies with good balance sheets and blessed with a strong campaign to support those agencies.”
We should note, however, that this is the first time in seven years that Gray Academy’s allocation from the Federation has been less than what it had received in the previous year.

I asked Gray Academy Head of School Lori Binder how the reduced allocation might affect Gray Academy this coming school year.

Lori responded: “We will certainly feel the impact from the reduction, especially given inflation and cost increases today. That said, we will mitigate any substantial impact by seeking cost savings across several expense lines. There will be no cuts to faculty or programming. We are grateful for the allocation we receive annually as it goes directly to supporting the school’s bursary assistance program and ensuring that a Jewish day school education remains accessible.”

Interestingly, the two agencies that received the largest increases in funding, JCFS and the Gwen Secter Centre, were both cited for the tremendous work they both have been doing in serving the needs of less fortunate members of our community, which have been even more acute as a result of the pandemic.
Here is what the report had to say about JCFS: “They currently serve about 5000 people each year. Federation funds work not supported by other sources include the rapidly growing caseload of seniors, addiction recovery supports, mental health services and a new and growing crisis in teen mental health. Having this robust agency that MB mandated for child welfare, and Federally supported for immigrant resettlement allows them to adapt to current needs.”
As for the Gwen Secter Centre, isn’t it ironic to consider that just a few years ago the very existence of the Gwen Secter Centre was seriously in question, as it appeared quite certain that it was about to be evicted from its home on Main Street and was desperately searching for a new location – until an “angel” came along and provided the funding for Gwen Secter to buy its building outright?

Here is what the Allocations Committee Report had to say about the Gwen Secter Centre: “The Winnipeg Jewish community has a large and growing proportion of seniors of ‘Baby Boomers’ age, individuals who may experience increasing isolation after they retire and as their families and friends diminish in number and scatter around the world. The agency addresses isolation of seniors with programming that include the key components of kosher food and Jewish culture that create connection with Jewish community. They now use online platforms as well as in-person offerings and run transportation programs to bring seniors to programs as a new medical transportation program in partnership with JCFS. The success of this program fills a pent up need predating the pandemic.
“Kosher Meals on Wheels: Now in house for the first time, KMOW reaches seniors in their homes with healthy, kosher food at an attainable price, social contact with the volunteers who deliver, and information that comes with the tray. By bringing it in house they are able to serve more people at lower cost and better match food choices to tastes.
“GSCLC pivoted to deliver 35,000 meals in one year during the pandemic. With a proven capacity for 600 meals per week they are now over 560 KMOW in December and growing.
“Senior Concierge: This pilot program moves to GSCLC to provide community wide outreach and referrals to reduce isolation of this growing number of seniors as well as coordinating transportation programs e.g. the Taxi Voucher Program for winter rides (previously housed at the Rady JCC) with Medical transportation rides.”
With so much uncertainty about how individuals will respond to the continually variating pressures exerted by a pandemic that, much as many would like to completely dislodge from their minds, it is clear from the Budget & Allocations Committee report that those concerns are still dominating the planning of many of our agencies.

 

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Local News

Israeli representative in Canada Sarah Mali talks about October 7 heroes

By MYRON LOVE Conflict often produces acts of heroism – but it is not only warriors who become heroes.  As Sarah Mali noted, heroism can come in many forms.  
 
Mali, the Director General of JFC-UIA Canada in Israel, made a stop in our community on Thursday, May 30, on behalf of the Jewish Federation of Winnipeg, during which she did a presentation at the Berney Theatre providing an update on the situation in the Jewish State from her perspective as  an Israeli – with a  focus on the different faces of heroism..
The British-born Mali made Aliyah in 2000 after earning a degree from the London School of Economics.  She also has degrees from the Hebrew University and the Harvard Kennedy School of Government.  The mother of four – the older two currently serving in the Israel Defence Forces – was the Director of Israel Engagement for the Jewish Federation of Toronto from 2007 to 2012. She returned to Israel to undertake her current assignment in 2012 and now lives in Jerusalem.
Mali is an accomplished writer and public speaker who was named one of “50 of Our Favorite Women Right Now” by ”Future of Judaism” in 2022.
Mali was introduced by Paula Parks, the Jewish Federation of Winnipeg’s President.  She presented her stories of heroism through a series of photographs. She began by recalling the first time in Israel that she heard sirens going off.  “I was in the car with one of my daughters,” she recounted.  “We weren’t quite sure what to do at first. But we got out of the car and did what all Israelis do.
“These past eight months, sirens have been sounded almost daily. Just recently, there was renewed rocket fire toward Tel Aviv.” 
 
The first group of heroes that Mali highlighted was the group of 14 young female soldiers who were kidnapped from their IDF base near Kibbutz Nahal Oz – near the Gaza border – which was overrun on October 7.
She spoke of the 60,000 residents of Israel’s north who were forced to leave their homes because of the danger from Hezbollah in the north and the heroic way that their fellow Israelis throughout the country have opened their homes and hearts to these internally displaced refugees, along with survivors of the attacks by Hamas in the south.
While Mali noted that she and her family are safe – living in the centre of the country – she described a recurring nightmare of loss. 
She told the story of Avitel Aladjem from Kibbutz Holit.  When the kibbutz was attacked, Aladjem was tasked by her neighbor, Canadian-born Adi Vital Kaploun, with looking after the latter’s two children – a three year old boy and a baby. Kaploun was murdered and Aladjem and the children were put on bicycles and driven to the Gaza border. For some strange and miraculous reason, the terrorist left the threesome at the border.  So Aladjem put the baby in a sling, picked up the three-year-old boy and carried both children back to safety.

Mali further praised the courage of the Magen David Adom medics who unhesitatingly put themselves in danger in those early desperate hours to save lives – and have continued saving lives throughout the war.  She recounted one story about an Israeli soldier who was shot in the neck and pronounced dead.  One medic, however, noticed that he was wearing a wedding band.
The medic noted that meant someone was waiting for the soldier at home and suggested the first responders should check him again  for any vital signs.  They found a pulse and had him evacuated by helicopter right away.  He was able to make a full recovery.
(Mali also noted that more than 15,000 Israeli soldiers have been wounded in the current conflict.)
One of the photos that Mali put on screen was the rescuer visiting the recovering soldier in hospital.
She spoke of the tremendous efforts of Israeli mental health professionals who have been having to deal with tens of thousands of traumatized Israeli of all ages.
She noted the miracle of her own daughter recently giving birth – bringing a new life into a world gone mad.
Another photo she posted was of a letter from a seven-year-old girl in Toronto who wanted to donate $23 to Israel to help with food, clothing and housing.
Mali’s final paean was to all the Jewish communities in the Diaspora – including our own – that have raised tremendous sums of money (over $4 million alone from our community), have staged rallies in support of our Israeli brethren, and many of whom have travelled to Israel, not only to show their support, but also to volunteer to help in many ways. 
“You are all heroes,” Mali told her audience.
Following her presentation, Mali took several questions from the audience.  One question concerned the ongoing conflict with Hezbollah in the north. “My head tells me that the IDF has to end Hezbollah,” Mali responded.  “But, as a mother with children serving in the IDF, I would be terrified.”
In answer to a second question about what some view as Israel’s poor public relations record, Mali pointed out that a major problem is that the Western media see the conflict – and the world –  in terms of victims and oppressors, and the Palestiniand in this worldview are ever the victims – and therefore, can do no wrong – while the Israelis are the oppressors whose every actions are judged as criminal or evil.
In concluding, Mali described the strong sense of determination and solidarity among most Israelis – an attitude exemplified by her own 17-year-old son who is impatient to join the IDF and take up the fight.
She added that “We Israelis want you to come to Israel, hear our stories and share them back in your communities.
 “Israel is a strong country with a strong army,” she observed.  “We are fighting not just for our own people but also for all Jews – and we are fighting against evil. This is our moment.”

Continue Reading

Local News

New York-based choreographer Josh Assor returning to hometown and Rainbow Stage for upcoming “Mary Poppins” production

By MYRON LOVE Josh Assor has a lengthy history, both with “Mary Poppins” and Rainbow Stage. So it would seem to be a no-brainer for Canada’s only summer theatre to invite the former Winnipegger-turned New York-based choreographer to return to his home town to choreograph this summer’s Rainbow Stage production of Mary Poppins (August 15-September 1).
Assor’s first experience with the beloved musical came just a short time into his stage career.  In 2011, the son of Hanania and Leslie Assor was cast in a touring production as Neleus, the statue who is brought to life by Mary.  In February 2012, he was elevated to the Broadway production in the same role.  In 2018, having transitioned from acting to choreography, he was tasked with choreographing a production of “Mary Poppins” at the Arrow Rock Lyceum Theatre in Arrow Rock, Missouri.  (He was invited back to Arrow Rock in 2019 to choreograph “Cinderella”).
“It is always nice to come back to Winnipeg where I started my career,” Assor says.
When it comes to musical theatre, Josh Assor has written a story of great success.  He was attracted to theatre and acting from a very young age. He actually began with some television roles, followed by stage work.  Some of the shows that he appeared in at Rainbow Stage were: “Peter Pan”, “Beauty and the Beast”, “Joseph and his Amazing Technicolour Dream Coat” and “The Little Mermaid”.
Along the way, the young performer began taking dancing lessons.  “I started training rather later in life in dance,” he recalls. “I enrolled in Ken Peter Dance Express when I was 15.  Originally, I was most interested in hip hop.  I then followed with tap and, a couple of years later, I began studying all forms of dance, including jazz, ballet and musical theatre.  By the time I was 17, I had decided to seriously pursue a career in the theatre.”
Assor attended Gray Academy to the end of Grade 9, then moved to Grant Park High School for Grades 10-12 to take the school’s well-known performing arts program. 
The budding performer left Winnipeg after graduation for Los Angeles where he had scored a scholarship to study at the prestigious EDGE Performing Arts Center.  He then moved to Toronto – at age 19 – to begin the next phase of his career.
“I signed with an agent in Toronto,” he said in an earlier interview with the Jewish Post. “Toronto is where most of the auditions take place.  I did some television but mostly worked on the stage.”
His first major role was in a production of “West Side Story” at the Stratford Festival in 2008, he recounts.
While he may have been based in Toronto over a period of three years, he notes, he spent a year in Montreal and the rest of the time in touring productions, which continued after his move to New York in 2010. 
In addition to touring with “Mary Poppins,”  he also toured as a  member of the cast of “The Wizard of Oz” and Disney’s first national tour of “Newsies” (in which he was the assistant dance captain).
After more than two years in ‘”Newsies,” Assor explained in that earlier interview, he was ready for a change of pace.  “From day one, to become a choreographer was always my goal,” he noted.   “I am happiest when I can be at my most creative.  I felt that I had had a good run as a performer.  I accomplished what I had wanted.  It was time to focus on my development as a choreographer.”
Back in New York,  his goal was to become a member of the faculty of the world-renowned Broadway Dance Centre.  He started as a substitute teacher, became a guest instructor and, for the past several years, has been a member of the faculty, focusing on musical theatre.
“People come from all over the world to study with us,” Assor said.
In addition to his teaching, Assor has continued to work professionally as a choreographer. Choreographic credits include: New York Fashion Week, the New York City Knicks, Audi, Celebrity Cruise Lines, Modos Furniture, Hard Rock Hotel, and Soho House, as well as regional productions of “Mary Poppins,” “Anastasia,” “Fiddler On The Roof,” “Natasha, Pierre & The Great Comet of 1812,” “Cinderella,” “Newsies,” and the world premiere of “Medicine the Musical,” which ran off-Broadway. He also choreographed Cedar Point (Ohio) Amusement Park’s 150th Anniversary Spectacular ,as well as the series ‘DJ Burnt Bannock,’ produced by Eagle Vision. He was the associate choreographer for the “Saturday Night Fever” National Tour as well as the Canadian Premier of “Newsies.”
In March 2020,  due to the pandemic lockdowns, Assor came home to Winnipeg for a while and, once here, he got a job with Eagle Vision, working with them for almost a year behind the scenes on a number of large scale television and film projects, such as “Burden Of Truth” and “Esther”.
Assor is currently choreographing a production of “Fiddler On The Roof” that just opened at a theatre in the Boston Area called North Shore Music Theater. He reports that he will also be choreographing “Fiddler” again in Connecticut in early 2025.
He adds that he has a new show that he choreographed – titled “Retrospect” – that will be mounted in various theme parks across the US.  Also coming up is a  week-long dance retreat at the End of August – which he co-owns with Orielle Marcus – titled “The Reset Dance Retreat”. 

Continue Reading

Local News

Penny Jones Square passionate advocate for Israel

By MYRON LOVE Perception is not reality.  While the perception may be that the world is once more against Jews and the State of Israel, we are not reliving the darkest days of the 1930s and early 1940s.  Polls consistently show that in both Canada and the United States, the great majority of the population is on our side.
In our own community, we can see the strong support we receive from such Christian Zionist friends as Reverend Don and Victoria James and their fellow Bridges For Peace members,;Pastor Rudy and Gina Fidel and the members of his Faith Temple; and John Plantz and the Church and Field Ministries.
But there may not be a more ardent supporter of Israel and fighter against antisemitism in our community than Penny Jones Square.  Penny has long had a strong feeling for Israel and the Jewish people but, since the horrendous events of October 7, she has taken it to an entirely new level.
Over the past eight months, Penny has been ubiquitous.  She has been attending pro-Israel rallies and speakers as well as counter-protests against anti-Israel protests.  In May alone, she was at the reading of the Megillat Shoah,  B’nai Brith’s “Unto Every Person There is a Name”, the Yom HaZikaron ceremony at the Rady Centre,  the JNF’s “Warriors’ Journeys” with two IDF reserve soldiers, and the Bridges for Peace event, “It’s about Time”, a ceremony in honour of Jewish Heritage Month at the Manitoba Legislature, the weekly rally in support of the hostages at Kenaston and Grant, and the Jewish Federation evening “Update from the Ground” with Sara Mali, Director General of JFC-UIA Canada in Israel.
Penny has also found time to pop up at one of the anti-Israel protests at City Hall  and the pro-Palestinian student encampment at the University of Manitoba  to take photos and report on them – as well as Ron East’s screening of his Oct. 7 massacre video at the University of  Winnipeg encampment.
I first met Penny seven years ago while on a JNF mission to Israel.  We found that we had similar views on a range of subjects.  On Tuesday, June 4, I was able to meet with Penny at the Asper Campus and gained an understanding of what inspired her devotion to Israel and the Jewish people.
Penny –  who grew up in Riverview and River Heights, attended the University of Manitoba and has an MA in English from there –  recalled that she “was awakened to the horrors of the Holocaust” at the age of 13 after seeing the 1959 movie, “The Diary of Anne Frank.”
“That led me to an ongoing study of antisemitism and the Holocaust and my abiding interest in standing up for Jews and fighting antisemitism,” she said.  “Along the way, I have acquired a profound admiration for Judaism and Jews who are, to my mind, ‘the light unto the nations’ that they were commanded to be.”
At the age of 22, she married David Square (who passed away almost three years ago) and they moved to a plot of land near Tyndall, Manitoba – off the grid, so to speak.  Penny and David spent four years building their own log home, cutting down trees from their property for the logs.
“We pursued our vision of living a self-sufficient lifestyle,” she recounted, “living mortgage-free, cutting our own firewood, growing our own food, and creating a magical sanctuary with flower gardens, two Zen gardens, a vegetable garden and numerous forest trails for walking and cross country skiing.”
She concedes that “it was a difficult life maintaining gardens, lawns and trails and bringing in the winter firewood – as well as working as one-of-a-kind art furniture designers and builders, but it was also a life blessed by the natural beauty surrounding us and by the beauty we created in our home, our art, and our cherished refuge”.
After almost 20 years, the couple closed their custom furniture business. While David pursued a career as a journalist and novelist, Penny worked at the University of Manitoba in the bookstore and as a tutor.
(A few months ago, Penny sold her property in the country and moved into Winnipeg.)
It was in 2007 that Penny really began to immerse herself in the study of anti-Semitism and the Holocaust.  It started when she signed up for Dr. Catherine Chatterley’s course on the history of antisemitism and the Holocaust.  (Chatterley specializes in the study of modern European history and the Holocaust and is the founder of the Canadian Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism.)
“I spent some time as a grader for her course and as a copy editor for her journal, “Anti-Semitism Studies,” Penny said.  “David and I promoted her annual lectures.  David took photos and I published articles about them.”
The couple also joined Winnipeg Friends of Israel – founded by Yolanda Papini-Pollock – and Penny helped with some of Papini-Pollock’s initiatives.
Penny notes that her love for Israel and admiration for the Jewish people was greatly strengthened by that 2017 trip to the Jewish State.  “To witness the transformation of a land of malarial swamps and desert to the wonder of Israel’s astonishing natural beauty, its olive and almond groves, forested areas and vibrant and thriving kibbutzim,  moshavim and cities – as well as the joy, resilience and exuberance of the Israeli people was awe-inspiring – while our tour of Yad Vashem was overwhelming and intensely saddening.
“In this present moment, I believe that it is my moral responsibility to denounce the immoral and irrational hatred of fundamentalist Islamic terrorism fiercely, fearlessly and honestly and state my allegiance  with the righteous and ethical example of Israel and the Jewish people.  Moral courage and a commitment to the truth are what is required of us to stop the lies and prevent this radical evil that is Islamic Jihadism from prevailing over the good and the humane, democratic values.”

Continue Reading

Copyright © 2017 - 2023 Jewish Post & News